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Advanced Toolpaths Reduce costs and cut programming time with advanced toolpaths like Deburr and Equal Scallop. Staff and TA’s are not available to set up users’ files for them. Since you only have 10 days after update installation to roll back, you probably cannot roll this back. After defining stock dimensions, u sers MUST manually update machining heights to reflect the stock thickness for each operation individually. Make sure you are using up-to-date drivers from your card manufacturer.
 
 

 

MasterCAM Step-by-Step Guide – Harvard GSD Fabrication Lab – Harvard Wiki

 

Finishing operations must be employed on a case-by-case basis, as the utility of each operation type varies from one file and geometry to the next. See reference pages linked above for a detailed explanation of concepts and usage that are common across all operation types. Commonly used finishing operations are listed below. Users must review them and determine which operations are appropriate for their geometry.

The Surface Finish Parallel operation moves the tool in equally spaced parallel passes in the XY plane across the surface. The toolpath can be drawn in any angle relative to the XY origin. This operation is often used with varying stepovers and machining angles to create surface patterns on site models. Used primarily to clear material from vertical or steep features. The Surface Finish Contour operation cuts geometry by offsetting toolpaths away from the drive surface at incremental heights.

As sloped geometry becomes steeper, the toolpaths get closer together; as that geometry becomes more shallow, the toolpaths are spaced farther apart. This operation is often paired with a flat endmill for use on vertical building faces. Note that the horizontal surface building top is the Drive surface.

Used primarily to clear flat areas, such as stepped terrain or building tops. The Surface Finish Shallow operation cuts geometry whose slope angle does not exceed a threshold users can set maximum.

This operation is often paired with a flat endmill for use on stepped topography and building tops. Users can dramatically reduce machining time by strategically using larger diameter tools to cut open areas, while targeting small diameter tools to narrower channels.

Used primarily to clear sloped areas, such as rolling topography. The Surface Finish Constant Scallop operation cuts geometry by dynamically adjusting stepover users can set maximum as a function of the slope angle for any given point along the drive surface. This method maintains a uniform scallop height across variable relief, and thus uniform smoothness. This operation is often paired with a ball endmill for use on rolling topography and gentle slopes.

Used to cut flat-bottomed holes, such as building footprints. The Pocket operation removes material from within a closed chain, creating recesses with flat bottoms. Note that t he Pocket operation includes its own internal Roughing and Finishing stages within the parameters. This operation is often paired with a flat endmill to cut building footprints. Pockets are preferred over Surface Finish Shallow for cutting deep, flat-bottomed recesses due to their incorporation of incremental depth cuts.

Used to trace linear features, such as final perimeter cut-out. The Contour operation cuts along a chain or series of chains. The cut may be compensated to the left or right of the chain s , or on center if compensation is turned off. The chain may be 2D planar or 3D.

The depth of cut can be absolute 2D only , or incremental 2D and 3D. Used to create precisely located holes. The Drill operation creates holes using points as input geometry.

Although it is possible to use endmills in a drilling operation, it is preferable to use drill bits. Selecting a Stepover. In most cases, select TOP as work coordinate system, tool plane, and construction plane. When machining the underside of a two-sided job flip milling , select FLIP as work coordinate system, tool plane, and construction plane.

Select largest diameter flat upcut endmill to remove material quickly. Harder materials require shorter tools. Special tools are available for roughing solid wood, plywood, and mdf. Input a positive offset for both Drive and Check surfaces.

Default is 0. Select One Way if stock material is non-uniform wood, other materials with grain , or Zigzag if stock material is uniform foam, plastics, mdf. Value should not exceed flute length of tool, and must be appropriate for stock material. Harder materials require smaller stepdown.

Value should not exceed tool diameter, and must be appropriate for stock material. Harder materials require smaller stepover.

Value should never be negative. Change value to match grain direction of stock if cutting method is One Way and stock material is non-uniform. Select largest diameter flat endmill that can maneuver completely around input geometry while producing desired resolution.

Select upcut endmill for soft, uniform materials foams , and downcut endmills for hard non-uniform materials wood, plywood, mdf.

Select largest diameter flat upcut endmill that can maneuver completely across input geometry while producing desired resolution. Select One Way if stock material is non-uniform wood, other materials with grain , or 3DCollapse if stock material is uniform foam, plastics, mdf. Select largest diameter ball endmill that can maneuver completely across input geometry while producing desired resolution.

Smaller values reduce scallop height, thus increasing smoothness, while also increasing machining time. Select largest diameter flat endmill that can maneuver completely within input geometry while producing desired resolution. Select upcut endmill for roughing and finishing if cutting soft uniform material foam.

Select upcut endmill for roughing, and downcut endmill for finishing if cutting hard non-uniform materials wood, plywood, mdf. This requires two separate Pocket operations – the first with only roughing enabled, and the second with only finishing enabled. User may input an offset for both walls and floors. Default is 0 for both values. Value entered as either a percentage of tool diameter, or an absolute distance.

Users may input plunge angle value in degrees. An increase in plunge angle corresponds with a decrease in machining time. Value should not exceed 30 degrees, and must be appropriate for stock material. Harder materials require smaller plunge angle. Enable “Machine Passes only at Final Depth” if pocket depth relative to adjacent geometry is equal to or less than the tool flute length.

Toggle between Left and Right depending on whether the tool should offset outside or inside the assigned chains. Turn off compensation if the assigned chains are intended as cut centerlines.

Enable if operation is intended for roughing, disable otherwise. Enable for small parts when vacuum hold down is used. Enable for all parts when mechanical hold down is used. User may select Automatic or Manual tab placement. Automatic works well for most situations, with minimum 4 tabs recommended. Once operations have been chosen, geometry has been assigned, and parameters have been adjusted, the next step is to generate toolpaths.

Toolpaths are visualized in the modeling space as Blue and Yellow lines that are drawn across the input geometry. Select the operation s that is are being used, then g enerate the selected operation by clicking , or regenerate all dirty operations by clicking.

Complex or corrupted geometry may cause toolpath generation to fail. In this situation, the problem geometry should be deleted from MasterCAM a prompt will warn the user that any operations that reference the problem geometry will be affected. The geometry can then be edited or recreated in Rhino, exported as a new.

Excessive toolpath generation times can sometimes be reduced by changing Visibility from Shaded to Wireframe. Trimmed surfaces with far-flung control points cause trouble when merged into MasterCAM.

Sometimes these problems can be averted by running a few Rhino commands on the problem surface s prior to merging:. Large, complex meshes and surfaces occasionally cause problems in MasterCAM as well, depending on how they were generated. This issue is usually solved by recreating the mesh or surface in Rhino or Grasshopper.

The FabLab provides a sample Grasshopper script that should produce usable geometry from the original problem geometry. Grasshopper Script for Recreating Geometry. In most cases, MasterCAM will not automatically generate the toolpath for a selected operation after its parameters and geometry have been assigned. If the operation lacks assigned geometry, or has had any changes made to the geometry assignment, parameters, or tool definitions, then the operation is considered “dirty” and the toolpath icon will instead display.

The toolpaths for a dirty operation will disappear from the modeling space until regenerated. If an attempt to verify dirty operations is made, MasterCAM will prompt the user to regenerate with a pop-up dialogue. Verification using dirty operations is inaccurate and should be avoided. Verification aka Simulation is the process of playing out the generated toolpaths in a virtual environment in order to check for errors and omissions. Successful verification accurate stock and tool definitions, no collisions found is a necessary pre-requisite to performing any real CNC machining at the GSD.

Student submitted jobs will not be approved or scheduled until successful verification is demonstrated. Select all operations that have been configured and will be used. Operations will be verified in chronological order according to their order in the Toolpath Manager. Click verify selected operations in the Toolpath Manager to open the Mastercam Simulator window. Search Advanced search…. Forums New posts Search forums. Media New media New comments Search media.

Everywhere Threads This forum This thread. New posts. Search forums. JavaScript is disabled. For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. You are using an out of date browser. It may not display this or other websites correctly. You should upgrade or use an alternative browser. Mastercam taking forever to startup??? Finegrain Diamond. Joined Sep 6, Location Seattle, Washington. Hi guys, I am lately? I don’t recall it being this bad in the past.

Anybody else seeing anything like this with Mastercam? I have all the usual other apps on this workstation and none of them are perceptibly slower, just Mastercam. Thanks, and regards. Joined Nov 14, Location canada. Click to expand Turns out there is more to it than just the last couple minor Windows Updates. While Mastercam did speed up after rolling back a couple updates, it soon got dog-slow again. I talked to Cimtech and they are aware of the problem, but no fix available :- : Probably can’t read the text The culprit is “Windows 10 Fall Creators Update, version “.

Since you only have 10 days after update installation to roll back, you probably cannot roll this back. Joined May 28, Location AZ. I’m no IT guru, or even a W10 user, so take this for what it’s worth: You might be able to do a System Restore to a time prior to the update, and return the OS to previous state.

Don’t know if that actually works on W10 if it’s still even something you CAN do , but I’ve had good result when I needed to revert to a previous setup in W7. From my understanding the build that causes the issue is Click the start button and then type ‘winver’ to check your build. Build If your computer will not automatically update to that build, you can force the issue by downloading from the Windows Update Catalog. If your reseller Cimtech is telling you to hold tight then they may not help with issues resulting from forcing a windows update so proceed at your own risk.

I am still seeing this problem.

 
 

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